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SVP 2016 Program and Abstracts Book is now available for download!


Click here to download the SVP 2016 Program and Abstracts Book.

Click here to purchase the printed version of the SVP 2016 Program and Abstracts Book.

 



Each year, vertebrate paleontologists, preparators, writers, artists and enthusiasts convene to share the latest research, attend workshops and field trips, and meet new fossil fans as well as old friends. It’s the world’s foremost forum on vertebrate paleontology: the Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. It’s usually referred to simply as “SVP”.


The 76th Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

About the 2016 Annual Meeting Logo

The 2016 SVP meeting logo features the dinosaur Diabloceratops eatoni, which was discovered in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM) in 2002 by Don DeBlieux of the Utah Geological Survey while working in partnership with the Bureau of Land management.  The discovery was excavated over multiple field seasons and formally described in 2010 by James Kirkland and Don DeBlieux.  The generic name Diabloceratops combines the Spanish word Diablo “devil” with the Latin word ceratops “horned face”, whereas the second half of the binomial eatoni honors Jeffrey Eaton for his role in establishing Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. To complete the logo, Diabloceratops is positioned in front of the Wasatch Mountain Range, which towers over Salt Lake City, Utah, where the original skull is on display and the 2016 annual meeting of SVP will be held. The 2016 Annual Meeting logo was designed by BJ Nichols from the Natural History Museum of Utah.
 

Welcome to Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City has changed a lot since SVP met at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort in the fall of 1998. After hosting the Olympic XIX Winter Games in 2002 the city has become much more modern. Liquor laws are in line with the rest of the country (private clubs for members only are a relic of the past and there are at least eight commercial breweries in Salt Lake County alone), public transit is one of the best in the nation (busses, trains, and bicycle lanes connect the entire city), and nearly every museum in the state has been remodeled or completely rebuilt (including the Natural History Museum of Utah, Brigham Young University’s Museum of Paleontology, the Utah Field House Museum of Natural History State Park, the BLM’s Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, the BLM’s Bigwater Visitor Center at the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, and the famous quarry and visitor center at Dinosaur National Monument).
 
With 12 museums containing paleontological resources that can be reached within 4 hours, Salt Lake City rests at the center of North America’s fossil bearing landscape. This will result in the most field trip opportunities ever offered to annual meeting attendees. Even if you do not take advantage of a field trip, be sure to spend extra time visiting one or more of the many museums in the region, take a bike ride in the city or on one of the world class mountain bike trails that lead right into the city, enjoy the views, or visit one of the many National Parks that are located around the state.
 
2016 is also an important year for the public land managing agencies that are associated with SVP, including the Bureau of Land Management, which is celebrating 70/40 – the seventieth anniversary of the bureau and 40 year anniversary of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), and the National Park Service, which is celebrating its centennial. Of special importance is Dinosaur National Monument, which is only three hours east of Salt Lake City and celebrated its centennial in 2015. If you have not visited Dinosaur National Monument, this will be your opportunity. 


 

2016 Annual Meeting Host Committee

Scott Foss, Co-chair
Bureau of Land Management, Washington, D.C.
sfoss@blm.gov

Randall Irmis, Co-chair
Natural History Museum of Utah and Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
irmis@umnh.utah.edu

James Kirkland, Field Trip Editor
Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
jameskirkland@utah.gov

ReBecca Hunt-Foster, Field Trip Coordinator & Photographer
Bureau of Land Management, Moab, Utah
rhuntfoster@blm.gov

Carolyn Levitt-Bussian, Museum Host & Volunteer Coordinator
Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
clevitt@nhmu.utah.edu

Martha Hayden, Host & Volunteer Coordinator
Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah
marthahayden@utah.gov

BJ Nicholls, Logo Design & Graphics
Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
bjn.slc@gmail.com

Benjamin Breeden, Student Representative
Natural History Museum of Utah and Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
b.breeden@utah.edu