Dinosaur National Monument Unveils Digital Quarry

October 7, 2015



Dinosaur National Monument’s famous Wall of Bones is now online for everyone to explore.

Two stories high and packed with fossils, Carnegie Quarry is one of the few places in existence where the public can view dinosaur bones exactly where they were first uncovered in the rock. This unique window into the Jurassic has fostered a century of careers in natural science and an appreciation for deep time in generations of visitors. It’s also the reason Dinosaur National Monument was founded by the US National Park Service, one hundred years ago this year.

Today, as Dinosaur National Monument celebrates its centenntial, a new website is bringing Carnegie Quarry to the world. Volunteers led by paleontologist Dan Chure have built the Digital Quarry over the past two years, photographing fossils, illustrating them for the website, digitizing historical records and consolidating data.

Carnegie Quarry originally held over 5000 fossils, 1500 of which remain in the rock exactly as they were deposited in an ancient riverbed. A third of those are currently included in the interactive Digital Quarry. Eventually, the Digital Quarry will incorporate all of the original 5000, digitally reconstructing the historic quarry and making all associated data and archival materials publicly accessible.

The Digital Quarry is sure to be an invaluable asset to paleontologists, educators and fossil fans alike. Explore it for yourself at CarnegieQuarry.com.