2009 Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize Recipients

Three-Dimensional Art — Esben Horn

Esben Horn at work
Dunkleosteus sculpture by Esben Horn

Top: Esben Horn at work
Bottom: Dunkleosteus sculpture by Horn.
Images courtesy of Esben Horn.

In 1997 I started my own company, 10 Tons, making puppets, props and set pieces for theatre, TV, commercials and film. In 2005 I almost stumbled upon a job for an aquarium that needed a shark, a whale and a big jellyfish model. Until that time it never occurred to me that I could combine my childhood's burning interest in natural science with my no less burning interest in sculpting. Since that time I have built big scale models of dinosaurs, small prehistoric invertebrates and plankton models for museums and aquariums around the world. Starting to work together with scientists and experts has been a fantastic experience. Meeting and working with dedicated and highly specialized people has been very inspiring and has challenged me to make better models.

In 2007 I found an old drawing of a Dunkleosteus that I made back in 1976 (when I was 10 years old). As a kid I drew this powerful monster more than a hundred times. The fascination of this fantastic creature had not faded during the past 31 years so I started sculpting this Devonian version of a Sherman Tank.

I would like to thank all the scientists that have helped me making my models scientific correct. Especially I would like to thank Philippe Janvier, John Long and Martin Rücklin that— during almost one year—tirelessly has commented on my Dunkleosteus sculpture. I would also like to thank my assistant and alchemist Rasmus. Without his inventive brain and brilliant craftsmanship I would not be able to deliver models in the quality I do.


View the 2009 Two-Dimensional Art and Scientific Illustration Lanzendorf PaleoArt Prize Recipients.