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2011 Taylor & Francis Award for Best Student Article in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology

Martin D. Brazeau (Honorable Mention)

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I earned my BSc in biology from McGill University. There, Bob Carroll spurred my career as a paleoichthyologist by steering me away from dinosaurs and towards drawers of fish flakes in the collections of the Redpath Museum purporting to be from Carboniferous stem-tetrapods known as rhizodontids. Recognizing the breadth and depth of the problems in ‘early vertebrate’ paleontology, I went on to do a PhD under Per Ahlberg at Uppsala University. Working towards a PhD in Europe certainly offered a less structured education than I might have received in North America, but the access to some of the oldest, largest, and most important collections of Paleozoic ‘fishes’ in the world was (and is) second to none. This permitted me to undertake a broad phylogenetic survey of early gnathostomes, including the problems of early osteichthyan interrelationships that led to the paper inJVP for which this award is being given.

It is a great honor and a pleasure to be recognized for this publication co-authored with my colleague and good friend, Matt Friedman. Matt and I continue to collaborate on a series of projects, including a sequel to this paper. While our ideas about osteichthyan and gnathostome phylogeny will inevitably change with new data, I hope that the spirit of this paper, with its focus on clarity of background assumptions and methodological rigor, will remain intact for a long time to come.

Read Brazeau's honorable mention co-authored article, "A reappraisal of the origin and basal radiation of the Osteichthyes" 


View the award recipient of the 2011 Taylor & Francis Award for Best Student Article in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.