Annual Meeting Field Trips

Eleven Field Trips will be offered in conjunction with the Annual Meeting. Advance registration for all Field Trips is required. Onsite registration will not be accepted. 

  • Mid Mesozoic Dinosaur Faunas of Central Utah
  • Bonebeds of the Morrison Formation
  • Rise of the Erg: Paleontology & Paleoenvironments of the Triassic-Jurassic Transition in Northeastern Utah
  • Fossil Lake Deposits of the Green River Formation: Not All Fish Are Preserved Equal
  • Brigham Young University Earth Science Museum and North American Museum of Ancient Life
  • Shorelines of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville
  • Vertebrate Paleontology, Stratigraphy and Paleohydrology of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument
  • Vertebrate Paleontology, Stratigraphy, Biochronology, and Paleoecology of Middle Eocene Rock Units in the Green River and Uinta Basins, Wyoming and Utah
  • The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Southern Utah
  • Tracking Dinosaurs in BLM Canyon County
  • Late Cretaceous Stratigraphy and Vertebrate Faunas of Southern Utah

Field Trip Disclaimer
All Field Trips are subject to change. SVP reserves the right to alter or cancel a Field Trip due to low registration or if access to site is limited or closed to the public.  In the event of a Field Trip cancellation, SVP will refund fees in full.

Mid Mesozoic Dinosaur Faunas of Central Utah
The dynamic interplay between salt tectonics and the early development of a foreland basin in central Utah has resulted in an extraordinarily complete record of Upper Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous strata preserving as many as 10 terrestrial vertebrate faunas dominated by dinosaurs across 50 million years. Ten million years or less has recently been proposed to separate the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation in this area. This three day field trip will examine several important areas in different geological settings that have led to the preservation of this extraordinary fossil record. Both the geological controls on fossil preservation will be considered as well as the major patterns of faunal turnover preserved in these strata.
 
Day 1 will focus on the transition between the Morrison Fm. and the lower Cedar Mountain Fm. in the northern Paradox Basin (area of salt tectonics) on BLM and Utah state lands on either side of Arches National Park. The morning will be spent in spent in the type area of the Yellow Cat and Poison Strip Members of the Cedar Mountain Fm. where eight dinosaurs have been described to date on the margins of “Lake Madsen”. The afternoon will be spent examining the mid-Mesozoic section north of Moab, Utah with visits to the Dalton Wells Quarry and the Mill Canyon Tracksite on the shores of the younger “Lake Carpenter” in the upper part of the Ruby Ranch Member of the Cedar Mountain Fm. Staying in Green River, Utah overnight.
 
Day 2 will consist of spending the morning examining the Yellow Cat Member and its contact with Morrison Fm., south of Green River, Utah, where four Cedar Mountain dinosaurs have been described to date in the area of the Don’s Ridge, Suarez, and Crystal Geyser Quarries. Following lunch at Crystal Geyser, we’ll head south to examine the area between Hanksville and Capitol Reef National Park, visiting the gigantic Hanksville-Burpee Quarry, perhaps the largest single dinosaur site in the Jurassic of Utah. Additionally, attention will be given to the lateral facies changes between the lower Yellow Cat and Buckhorn Conglomerate at the base of the Cedar Mountain Fm. and the complex stratigraphic variability at the base of the Upper Cretaceous in the area of the Sevier forebulge. Returning to Green River, Utah overnight.
 
Day 3 We’ll cross the San Rafael Swell to examine the mid-Mesozoic in the Sevier foreland Basin, where the thickest sections of the Ruby Ranch and the only exposures of the Mussentuchit Mbr. of the Cedar Mountain Fm. occur. In the morning, the spectacular outcrops in the Mussentuchit Badlands will be examined. More than 80 taxa have been identified in this area based on microvertebrate and skeletal remains. The afternoon will be spent looking at the type area of the Cedar Mountain Fm. and Buckhorn Conglomerate with short visits to the Upper Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry and the Prehistoric Museum in Price, Utah before returning to Salt Lake City.
 
Date: Sunday, October 23 – Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 23, at 7:30 AM. Ends Tuesday, October 25, at 6:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $315.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via rental vans, double occupancy hotel rooms, snacks, lunch, beverages, and a field trip guide.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 12
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 30
 
Transportation: Rental vans
 
What to Wear or Bring with You: A hat along with sunscreen and clothing covering your arms and legs as it may be hot or, less likely, wet. A water bottle would be useful. Hiking shoes as the terrain is hilly, and somewhat rocky.
 
Physical Capabilities: Must be able to walk on hilly trails for about a half a mile at a time and endure prolonged exposure to sun and wind.
 
Leaders:
Jim Kirkland
Utah Geological Survey
PO Box 146100
1594 W. North Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
jameskirkland@utah.gov
Phone: (801) 537-3307

ReBecca Hunt-Foster
Bureau of Land Management
Moab Field Office
82 East Dogwood
Moab, UT 84532
rhuntfoster@blm.gov
Phone: (435) 259-2179
 
Bonebeds of the Morrison Formation
The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation has been famous for its massive dinosaur bonebeds since its discovery in the late 19th century. This 2-day field trip is intended to provide participants the opportunity to visit some of the most historic dinosaur bonebeds of the Morrison Formation in Utah and Colorado. We will visit the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, Mygatt-Moore Quarry, Rigg's Quarry 13 and the Fruita Paleontological Area, which have produced thousands of fossils and thirteen holotype specimens of dinosaurs, crocodylomorphs, mammals, fish, and more, including Brachiosaurus altithorax, Fruitadens haagarorum, Mymoorapelta maysi, and Marshosaurus bicentesimus. Participants will learn the roles that these quarries played in the “Great American Dinosaur Rush”, and see how these sites are still providing important paleontological data today.
 
Date: Monday, October 24 – Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: Beings Monday, October 24, at 7:30 AM. Ends Tuesday, October 25, at 8:30 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $225.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via vans, snacks, lunches, museum reception, double occupancy lodgings with a continental breakfast, and a field trip guidebook.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 11
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
 
Transportation: Rental vans
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Participants should bring a wide-brimmed hat along with sunscreen and clothing to cover arms and legs, as there is no natural shade at some sites. Also, participants should bring a water bottle and moderate hiking footwear as the terrain is hilly and occasionally rocky.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Participants should be able to walk on trails and uneven ground for about a mile and endure prolonged exposure to sun and wind.
 
Leaders:
John Foster
Museum of Moab
118 East Center St.
Moab, UT 84532
director@moabmuseum.org
Phone: (435) 259-7985
 
Michael Leschin
Bureau of Land Management-Price Field Office
125 South 600 West
Price, UT 84501
mleschin@blm.gov
Phone: (435) 636-3619
 
Julia McHugh
Museums of Western Colorado
P.O. Box 20000
Grand Junction, CO 81502
jmchugh@westcomuseum.org
Phone: (970) 242-0971
 
Joseph Peterson
Department of Geology
University of Wisconsin
Oshkosh, Room 211, Harrington Hall
Oshkosh, WI 54901
petersoj@uwosh.edu
Phone: 920-424-4463
 
Rise of the Erg: Paleontology & Paleoenvironments of the Triassic-Jurassic Transition in Northeastern Utah
The Late Triassic – Early Jurassic transition in the western US records one of the most striking terrestrial environmental transformations in the history of North America where the fluvio-lacustrine sandstone Chinle Formation is transgressed by the vast erg system of the Nugget/Navajo/Aztec Sandstones. Exposures in NE Utah are ideal for looking at this transition as they are closely spaced and accessible.  Oct 23: Travel to Vernal, Utah. October 24: Visit the lacustrine/fluvial Chinle beds, overlain by increasingly drier transitional beds, a Brachychirotherium trackway site with hundreds of tracks in the basal, non-eolian Nugget Sandstone.  These basal units are overlain by large-scale dunes with vertebrate and invertebrate trace fossils, and 3m-tall interdunal carbonate spring mounds that fed a freshwater lake with gastropods and many invertebrate ichnofossils. Dramatic, large-scale soft sediment deformation of dune structures immediately beneath the mounds is indicative of seismic activity that may have generated the eruption of groundwater.  Oct 25: Visit a non-carbonate interdunal lake/oasis deposit to look at the taphonomy and sedimentology of the Saints and Sinners bone bed and see the transition from dune to interdune playa, to fluctuating lake levels, to a saline playa, to heavily bioturbated wetted dunes, and back to a normal dune system.  This site has produced over 11,000 bones of dinosaurs, sphenodonts, sphenosuchians, pterosaurs, and drepanosaurs (with many complete, three dimensional, articulated skeletons) as well as dinosaur trackways and rare cycadeoid foliage along the shoreline of a lake.  Numerous bones can still be seen in the quarry.   Drepanosaurs are restricted to the Carnian and Norian globally, indicating that at least the lower half of the Nugget here is Late Triassic in age.  Fossils in this oasis are different from those seen on and in dune slip surfaces and document ecological segregation within the erg.  Half of Day 2 will be a visit to the Museum of Paleontology at Brigham Young University to examine the spectacular vertebrate fossils the Saints and Sinners Quarry.  In spite of the great environmental changes from the Chinle to the Nugget, several groups of vertebrates are recorded in both the Chinle and the Saints and Sinners Quarry, indicating that faunal change is less than expected.  Although not part of the subject of the field trip, attendees will tour of the Carnegie Quarry Wall of Bones at Dinosaur National Monument after hours and dine in the Quarry Exhibit Hall. Discovered in 1909, this is the site for which the Monument was established in 1915.
 
Date: Sunday, October 23 – Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 23, at 5:00 PM. Ends Tuesday, October 25, at 7:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $235.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation, 2 nights lodging, 3 box lunches, pizza dinner at Carnegie Quarry, jump drive with relevant publications, handouts, and water. Complimentary breakfast will be provided by hotel on October 24 and 25.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 20
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
 
Transportation: Rental vans
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Daily high in field area in late October is in the mid- 50sF.  Chance of precipitation is low. Participants should bring hats, sun screen, water bottles, warm clothes, good hiking shoes, camera, and hand lens.
 
Physical Capabilities: Must be able to ride in 10 person van for 3.5 hours to arrive at field trip area.  A similar drive occurs to return to meeting venue. To visit quarries and outcrops participant must be able to walk over uneven terrain at 5,000 foot above sea level up steep grades for 1/2 mile in temperatures possibly ranging from 30 degrees to 65 degrees F.  The Carnegie Quarry is located inside the Quarry Exhibit Hall which is ADA compliant.

Leaders:
Dan Chure
Dinosaur National Monument
Box 128
Jensen, UT 84035
dan_chure@nps.gov
Phone: (801) 703-1267
 
Brooks Britt
Museum of Paleontology
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
brooks_britt@byu.edu
Phone: (801) 616-9419
 
George Engelmann
University of Nebraska
6001 Dodge St
Omaha, NE 68182
gengelmann@unomaha.edu
Phone: (402) 213-8046

Fossil Lake Deposits of the Green River Formation: Not All Fish Are Preserved Equal
During this two-day trip near Kemmerer, Wyoming, participants will use volcanic ash marker beds to explore changing lake facies from beach, to nearshore, to deepwater sediments and the associated change in preservation of fossils, most commonly fish. Of particular interest are horizons preserving fish with skin and eyes but no bones. Sites will include natural exposures, fresh exposures in fossil quarry walls, and exhibits at Fossil Butte National Monument.
 
Date: Monday, October 24 – Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: Begins Monday, October 24, at 7:30 AM. Ends Tuesday, October 25, at 7:30 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $190.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via vans, snacks, beverages, 1 breakfast, 2 lunches, 1 dinner, and 1 night lodging.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 13
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 25
 
Transportation: Rental vans will arrive at the main entrance to the Grand America Hotel at 7:00 AM on Monday, October 24, 2016 and depart at 7:30 AM. Target return time is 7:30 PM on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at the Grand America Hotel.
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  A hat along with sunscreen for face and hands and layered warm clothing covering your arms and legs as it will be cool to cold and possibly with snow, it most certainly will not be hot. A water bottle would be useful. Moderate hiking footwear as the terrain is hilly and, while quarry floors are flat, they have stone scattered over their surface. We will provide chisels and some hammers, so if you are able, please bring a bricklayer’s hammer.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Must be able to walk over uneven terrain at 7,500 foot above sea level up steep grades for ¼ mile in temperatures ranging from 15 degrees to 40 degrees F not including wind chill.
 
Leaders:
Arvid Aase (corresponding trip leader)
Fossil Butte National Monument
PO Box 592
Kemmerer, WY 83101
arvid_aase@nps.gov
Phone: (307) 877-4455 x26
Mobile: (307) 220-7604
 
Robert Gaines
Pomona College Geology Department
185 E. 6th St. Room 232
Claremont, CA 91711
robert.gaines@pomona.edu
Phone: (909) 607-0982
 
Brigham Young University Earth Science Museum and North American Museum of Ancient Life
This one day field trip will visit the Brigham Young University Earth Science Museum in Provo, UT and the North American Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, UT.
 
The BYU Museum of Paleontology was built in 1976 to prepare, display, and house the rock and dinosaur fossils collected by Dr. Jim Jensen and his crews. Over decades of field work, Dr. Jensen and crews gathered fossils from locations in Utah, Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming. They house a large collection of Pleistocene mammal fossils and paleobotanical specimens. In recent years, teams led by Dr. Brooks Britt and Dr. Rod Sheetz have been collecting fossils from various sites in eastern Utah including from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, the Jurassic Morrison Formation, and the Triassic/Jurassic Nugget Formation. We will visit the displays and the collections that number over 17,000 specimens. 
 
The North American Museum of Ancient Life has one of the world’s largest displays of mounted dinosaurs with 60 complete dinosaur skeletons, and more than 50 hands-on exhibits.  In addition to visiting the exhibits we will tour the fossil preparation lab where they are working on dinosaur fossils from the Morrison Formation of Wyoming. The lab also houses the 9-ton Utahraptor block that was collected by the Utah Geological Survey in 2014 from the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation of eastern l Utah and is actively being prepared.
 
Date: Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $65.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via bus, admission to the museums, and lunch at NAMAL.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 20
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 40
 
Transportation: Rental bus
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Since we will be indoors most the time, no special clothing is needed other than comfortable shoes. We will provide lunch at the North American Museum of Ancient Life.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Other than being able to stand and walk around for several hours, no special physical capabilities are needed. Both venues are handicap accessible.
 
Leaders:
Don DeBlieux
Utah Geological Survey
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
dondeblieux@utah.gov
 
Brooks Britt
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
Brooks_britt@byu.edu
 
Rod Sheetz
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
rod_sheetz@byu.edu
 
Rick Hunter
North American Museum of Ancient Life
Lehi, UT 84043
rhunter@thanksgivingpoint.org
 
Shorelines of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville
This one day field trip will visit classic shoreline locations on Pleistocene Lake Bonneville. Stops will including the G.K. Gilbert Geologic View Park at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon; a bar and spit complex at the Point of the Mountain; Stockton Bar, a world class geomorphic feature first interpreted by legendary geologist Grove Karl “GK” Gilbert in USGS Monograph 1, 1890; and Great Salt Lake. Discussion topics will include climate, tectonics and the Wasatch Fault, sedimentation and stratigraphy, the exploitation vs preservation of world-class geomorphic/geologic landforms; and Pleistocene flora and fauna (both with and without vertebrae).
 
Lake Bonneville was a huge freshwater lake that existed during late Pleistocene marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, approximately 14,000 to 29,000 calendar years ago. A shift to wetter and colder conditions triggered its expansion from the location of the present Great Salt Lake to surrounding valleys.  About 18,000 years ago, Lake Bonneville reached its maximum depth of over 300 meters and covered about 51,000 km2 of western Utah and parts of eastern Nevada and southern Idaho.  While at its highest level, the lake eroded through a sediment dam at Red Rock Pass in Idaho and catastrophically dropped about 100 meters.  Thereafter, a climatic shift to warmer and dryer conditions (similar to present) caused Lake Bonneville to shrink, leaving Great Salt Lake as a saline remnant.
 
The shorelines left by Lake Bonneville can be seen around Salt Lake and neighboring valleys like rings around a bathtub. Shoreline features include beaches, deltas, wave-cut benches, and spits and bars. The bones of larger extinct mammals have been repeatedly been found within these shoreline deposits. The climatic conditions that created Lake Bonneville also caused glaciation in the Wasatch Range that extended to the lake shores.
 
Date: Sunday, October 30, 2016
 
Time: 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $70.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation, lunches, and guidebooks.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 25
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 40
 
Transportation: Rental bus
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  The trip will not venture far from paved roads, no special clothing is needed other than comfortable shoes. A box lunch, snacks, and drinks will be provided.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Other than being able to stand and walk around for several hours, no special physical capabilities are needed. Some stops are not handicap accessible.
 
Leaders:
Mark Milligan
Utah Geological Survey
1594 W North Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84116
markmilligan@utah.gov
(801) 537-3326
 
Greg McDonald
Regional Paleontologist
Bureau of Land Management
Utah State Office
440 West 200 South, Suite 600
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1345
hmcdonald@blm.gov
(801) 539-4032
 
Vertebrate Paleontology, Stratigraphy and Paleohydrology of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument
Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK) contains the largest and most diverse, open-site Rancholabrean, vertebrate faunal assemblage in the Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin. This three-day field trip will travel to this large (nearly 23,000 acres), uniquely urban-interface national monument abutting the city of Las Vegas, NV where a parched desert landscape today reveals a story of water - of fossil springs - their genesis, ultimate demise and their megafaunal inhabitants.
 
We will have one long day to examine the stratigraphy, paleohydrology and chronology of TUSK’s extensive groundwater discharge deposits (formerly desert wetlands), and the local fauna (Tule Springs local fauna) entombed therein.
 
We will reconstruct the detailed history of the deposits, revealed by geologic mapping, stratigraphic analysis and targeted radiocarbon and luminescence dating and ascend through nearly 250 ka of the Las Vegas Formation, examining the groundwater discharge deposits and each “bin of time” containing vertebrate fossils. The geologic record reveals that groundwater discharge deposits there provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes in the Las Vegas Valley during the past 35 ka. We will show on the outcrop cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores, including Dansgaard–Oeschger cycles and other millennial and sub-millennial climatic perturbations.
 
Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events, as evidenced by widespread erosion and soils, resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems at multiple times during the late Quaternary. Drought-like conditions typically lasted for a few centuries, highlighting the threat of anthropogenic warming to endemic fauna and flora that depend on desert wetlands to provide a consistent source of water in an otherwise arid landscape And how did wetlands dependent biota in the late Pleistocene respond to rapid climate change? Throw the megafauna back in the mix and it makes it very compelling to query the effects of abrupt climate change in the very near past to help inform the very near future. This new paleohydrologic record has profound implications for the direction of vertebrate paleontologic research in TUSK and will be highlighted on this trip. TUSK has become a linchpin and a natural laboratory for understanding hydrologic as well as biologic responses to past episodes of synoptic-scale climate change.
 
Day 1 we will travel from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas Nevada in time to check into our hotel (Aliante Hotel), Day 2 we will spend an entire (long) day in Tule Springs Fossil Beds (see attached map). Day 3 will enter the park again for one last look and head back to Salt Lake City.
 
Date: Sunday, October 23 – Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 23, at 7:30 AM. Ends Tuesday, October 25, at 6:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $285.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via 4WD vehicles, double occupancy hotel room, snacks, water and a field trip guide.  All meals on your own.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 12
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 20
 
Transportation: 4WD SUVs
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Weather can be hot, even in October, or cool and very windy. Plan for wind and sun. Moderate hiking over uneven terrain involved, hiking shoes are recommended. A hat along with sunscreen and clothing covering your arms and legs is a very good idea. A water bottle would be useful.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Must be able to walk on trails for about a half a mile at a time and endure prolonged exposure to sun and wind.
 
Leaders:
Kathleen Springer
U.S. Geological Survey
525 535 South Wilson Street
Pasadena, CA 91106
Phone: (951) 218-0866
kspringer@usgs.gov

Eric Scott
Dr. John D. Cooper Archaeological and Paleontological Center
1141 East Chestnut Avenue
Santa Ana, CA 92701
Phone: (714) 647-2103
erscott@exchange.fullerton.edu

Jeff Pigati
U.S. Geological Survey
Denver Federal Center
Box 25046, MS-980
Denver CO 80225
Phone: (303) 236-7870
Fax: 303-236-5349
jpigati@usgs.gov
 
Vertebrate Paleontology, Stratigraphy, Biochronology, and Paleoecology of Middle Eocene Rock Units in the Green River and Uinta Basins, Wyoming and Utah
Situated to the north and south of the Uinta Mountains in Wyoming and Utah respectively, the Bridger and Uinta basins have great tremendous scientific importance and are also of historic interest to vertebrate paleontologists.  The rock units and fossils of the Bridger basin (actually part of the southern Green River Basin) and the Uinta Basin have been the focus of paleontological investigations for the last 140 years.  This field excursion is focused on three closely-related stratigraphically adjacent and overlying fluvial rock units that are best known for their assemblages of middle Eocene vertebrate fossils.  The Bridger, Uinta, and Duchesne River formations are the stratotypes for the Bridgerian, Uintan and Duchesnean North American Land Mammal “Ages” (NALMA’s), and the fossils and sediments of these formations provide a critically important interrelated record of biotic, environmental, and climatic history spanning approximately 10 million years from 49 to 39 Ma. This three-day trip will provide participants with an opportunity to visit historically and scientifically important sites within these basins, examine the stratigraphy and discuss depositional history and paleoecology, and discuss recent advances in paleontological research completed by the field trip leaders.
 
Date: Sunday, October 30 – Tuesday, November 1, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 30, at 8:00 AM. Ends Tuesday, November 1, at 8:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $390.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Field trip guidebook, snacks, lunches, transportation, and lodging. Dinner is not included. 
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 16
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 16
 
Transportation: 4WD SUVs
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Dress for anything from extremely cold and snowy to warm and dry. Windbreaker recommended.
 
Leaders:
Paul C. Murphey
Department of Paleontology
San Diego Natural History Museum
San Diego CA 92101
pmurphey@sdnhm.org
 Mobile: (303) 882-8048
 
K.E. “Beth” Townsend
Department of Anatomy
Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine
Midwestern University, Glendale AZ 85308
btowns@midwestern.edu
Phone: (623) 572-3332
Mobile: (303) 895-0513
 
James Westgate
Earth & Space Sciences
Lamar University
Beaumont TX 77710
james.westgate@lamar.edu
Phone: (409) 880-7970
Mobile: (409) 673-0049
 
Anthony R. Friscia
Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology
University of California Los Angeles
Los Angeles CA 90095
tonyf@ucla.edu
Phone: (310) 206-6011
Mobile: (310) 775-3538
 
Emmett Evanoff
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
University of Northern Colorado
Greeley CO 80639
Emmett.Evanoff@unco.edu
Phone: 303-506-7385
 
Gregg F. Gunnell
Division of Fossil Primates
Duke University Lemur Center
Durham, NC 27705
gregg.gunnell@duke.edu
Phone: (919) 684-9820
Mobile: (734) 604-2685
 
The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Southern Utah
In recent years, the leader and organizers have conducted several studies of the Chinle Formation in National Parks of Utah that have added to our understanding of lithostratigraphic correlations, facies variations, paleontology, and biostratigraphy of Upper Triassic and basal Jurassic strata in the southwestern United States. This National Park Service Centennial field trip will familiarize attendees with exposures of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation exposed across central and southern Utah, emphasizing federal lands including four national parks.  Variations in the lithostratigraphy between localities will be examined, and important fossil sites will be discussed and placed within the overall context of Upper Triassic environmental and biotic change. We will also consider the varied hypotheses for the placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary within the early Mesozoic sequence of the western United States.
 
This trip will transverse the most continuous terrestrial Mesozoic stratigraphic sequence on Earth, making a few short stops at Upper Cretaceous outcrops to provide additional context.
 
On day one we will examine the thin Upper Triassic sequence at the edge of the depositional basin, onlapping the Ancestral Rockies. However, we will concentrate on the Chinle sections deposited during intervals of active salt tectonics in the adjoining Paradox Basin, specifically in Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and surrounding areas of east-central Utah. We will overnight in Green River surrounded by marine Upper Cretaceous deposits.
 
On day two we will examine the Upper Triassic sequences in the eastern San Rafael Swell of central Utah, and hike through the Chinle Formation section at Capitol Reef National Park. We will overnight in Torrey, Utah surrounded by Triassic-Jurassic deposits.
 
On day three we will journey to southwestern Utah across Boulder Mountain and Grand Staircase–Escalate National Monument to examine the Chinle section on the west side of the Circle Cliffs, noting the regional stratigraphic uniformity of these spectacular outcrops across much of central Utah. We will overnight in Mt Carmel Junction surrounded by marine Middle Jurassic deposits.
 
On day four we will discuss new revelations about Chinle stratigraphy and biostratigraphy near the southwestern limits of Upper Triassic terrestrial outcrops in the western United States at Zion National Park and in the St. George area, with a visit to the basal Jurassic deposits at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site before returning to Salt Lake City.
 
Date: Sunday, October 30 – Wednesday, November 2, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 30, at 7:00 AM. Ends Wednesday, November 2, at 7:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $515.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation, box lunches, snacks, drinks, lodging, and a field trip guidebook.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 20
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 40
 
Transportation: Rental bus
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Southern Utah in October has average daytime temperatures with an average of about 50° F, and may be windy and/or wet. Warm clothing is recommended. Attendees should bring cold weather clothing, good walking shoes or boots, a hat, a pack, and water. There will be a few hikes of a half-mile or more, some over steep topography.
 
Physical Capabilities:  There will be a few hikes over moderate distance over steep terrain. Many stops are not handicap accessible.
 
Leaders:
Jeffrey W. Martz
University of Houston-Downtown
Phone: (801) 819-4021
martzj@uhd.edu
 
James Kirkland
Utah Geological Survey
jameskirkland@utah.gov
 
Andrew Milner
St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm
arcmilner@gmail.com

Vincent Santucci
National Park Service
vincent_santucci@nps.gov

Tracking Dinosaurs in BLM Canyon Country
The remarkably extensive and abundant Mesozoic-aged exposures on the public lands around the Moab area have long made this region well known for ichnofossils. The nearly complete record of Upper Triassic through Lower Cretaceous rocks exposed here is well known for its sheer abundance of tracks and traces. This three-day field trip will visit many important classic and new sites exposed in the Bureau of Land Management’s Canyon Country District. 
           
Day 1 we will travel from Salt Lake City to Moab, in Southeastern Utah and will visit traces and tracksites located on BLM lands. Our first stop will be the Copper Ridge Dinosaur Tracksite, where we will view the tracks of a turning sauropod in the Morrison Formation, along with the first Hispanosauropus tracks identified outside Europe. This trackway has historically been attributed to a limping theropod. Immediately following we will visit the Mill Canyon Dinosaur Tracksite (Cedar Mountain Formation; Ruby Ranch Member). This newly discovered tracksite preserves one of the most diverse and largest Early Cretaceous dinosaur tracksites in North America and was the subject of recent interpretive efforts by the Bureau of Land Management. If time allows, we will visit a possible cynodont burrow complex found in the erg deposits of the Navajo Formation west of Moab. We will spend the evening in Moab.
 
Day 2 will consist of driving south to the Indian Creek and Lisbon Valley areas to view tracks in the Chinle, Wingate and Navajo formations, along with the “Last Phytosaur” – a cast of a phytosaur skull pressed into the basal-most sands of the Wingate Sandstone. We will view a variety of Eubrontes and Grallator tracksites, including archosauromorph and dicynodont tracks. We will return to Moab for the evening.
 
Day 3 we will visit the Fisher Mesa Tracksite on Forest Service land in the La Sal Mountains. This Entrada Sandstone tracksite is part of the Moab “Megatracksite” that preserves millions of Megalosauripus tracks in the Moab area. Afterwards we will visit our last Moab area site, the Poison Spider Tracksite, where we will view Eubrontes, Grallator, and the type of little bird-sized Anomoepus moabensis in an oasis deposit within the Navajo Sandstone. We will then travel to the new Moab Giants Museum for a tour of the facilities before heading through the San Rafael Swell where we will visit the Moore/Moline Reef Trackway in the Turonian Ferron Sandstone. Our last stop will be at the Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum in Price, where we will view tracks found from the surrounding Book Cliffs Mesaverde Group before returning to Salt Lake City. Final schedule will be flexible to accommodate maximum tracking opportunities.
 
Date: Sunday, October 30 – Tuesday, November 1, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 30, at 8:30 AM. Ends Tuesday, November 1, at 8:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $405.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via vans, double occupancy hotel rooms, snacks, lunch, beverages, and a field trip guide.
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 12
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 40
 
Transportation:
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  A hat along with sunscreen and clothing covering your arms and legs as it may be hot, or cool and wet. A water bottle would be useful. Hiking shoes as the terrain is hilly, and somewhat rocky.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Must be able to walk on trails and off trail across semi-rugged, and occasionally steep terrain for about a half a mile at a time and endure prolonged exposure to sun and wind.
 
Leaders:
ReBecca Hunt-Foster
Bureau of Land Management
Canyon Country District Office
82 East Dogwood
Moab, UT 84532
Phone: (435) 259-2179
rhuntfoster@blm.gov
 
John Foster
Museum of Moab
118 East Center Street
Moab, UT 84532
Phone: (435) 259-7985
director@moabmuseum.org
 
Neffra Matthews
Geospatial Section
National Operations Center
Denver Federal Center, Bldg. 50
P.O. Box 25047, OC-534
Denver, CO 80225-0047
Phone: (303) 236-0176
n1matthe@blm.gov
 
Brent H. Breithaupt
5353 Yellowstone Road
Cheyenne, WY 82009
Phone: (307) 775-6052
Brent_Breithaupt@blm.gov
 
Martin Lockley
Dinosaur Tracks Museum
University of Colorado at Denver
PO Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217
Martin.Lockley@UCDenver.edu
 
Andrew Milner
St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm
2180 East Riverside Drive
St. George, Utah 84790
Phone: (435) 574-3466, ext. 2
arcmilner@gmail.com
 
Josh Smith
Western Slope Paleontological Services, Ltd.
396 1/2 Rosevale Rd.
Grand Junction, Colorado 81507
Phone: (970) 639-2920
dinotrack@hotmail.com
 
Late Cretaceous Stratigraphy and Vertebrate Faunas of Southern Utah
This three day trip would visit select Late Cretaceous outcrops in southern Utah to examine classic and recent vertebrate collecting localities and highlight the last 20 years of work, since the creation of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The local succession, deposited in the southern portion of Laramidia, is mostly terrestrial, can exceed 3,000 meters in thickness, and contains a globally significant record of terrestrial vertebrate ecosystems spanning Cenomanian to Campanian time. Among the macro- and mesovertebrates, over twenty new species of dinosaurs (11 are published), several new crocodylians, numerous turtles, and marine reptiles have been recovered in the last 15 years, making it one of the most productive and exciting areas for Cretaceous research in North America. The microvertebrate record is even more extensive, with mammals being particularly well documented. The collective fauna recovered from these strata indicates they hold one of the most continuous Late Cretaceous vertebrate terrestrial records documented in North America, possibly the world.
 
Day one we will leave Salt Lake City by 8:00 am on Sunday morning, proceeding south to Cedar City (5 hours), and then east to into Cedar Canyon along Highway 14 to examine outcrops of the Naturita and Straight Cliffs formations that are more proximal to the Sevier Fold and Thrust Belt. Here we will discuss facies effects on faunal makeup and the results of new sampling strategies for microvertebrates. We will then spend the night near Bryce Canyon National Park.
 
Day two we will examine fossiliferous outcrops of the Straight Cliffs and Wahweap formations around the Paunsaugunt Plateau and Bryce Canyon National Park. The first stop will be near the “Hatshop” locality in the John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. In this vicinity is one of the most productive Santonian age vertebrate microsites in southern Laramidia. The second stop will examine Waweap outcrops at the south end of Bryce Canyon NP. After lunch, we will proceed east on Highway 12 into Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument to examine the Naturita and Tropic Shale outcrops north of Henrieville, and then proceed east into Henrieville Canyon to examine more distal outcrops of the Straight Cliffs (1 stop) and Wahweap formations (1 stop). At each stop an overview of the vertebrate fauna and depositional environments will be made, with additional discussions as to the significance of each fauna in regards to biogeography, phylogenetics, and faunal succession. From there we will drive into Escalante for dinner and stay at the Prospector Inn.
 
Day three we will first examine outcrops of the Kaiparowits Formation along the grade where Highway 12 ascends “The Blues.” Here we will examine fossiliferous outcrops and discuss the new finds and significance of recent work in the Kaiparowits Formation. Time permitting, we will also observe the largely non-fossiliferous beds of the Grand Castle/Canaan Peak formational complex in Escalante Canyon, just north of Highway 12. These beds are suspected to be depositional and facies equivalents to the Canyon Range Conglomerate and North Horn Formation found farther north, but age control is lacking. Regardless, the K-T boundary either occurs within, or in the long unconformity at the base of the Canaan Peak Formation. Eat an early lunch on the outcrop and then return back to Salt Lake City.
 
Date: Sunday, October 30 – Tuesday, November 1, 2016
 
Time: Begins Sunday, October 30, at 8:00 AM. Ends Tuesday, November 1, at 7:00 PM.
 
Pick Up Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Drop Off Location: Grand America Hotel
 
Cost: $210.00 USD per person
 
Cost includes: Transportation via vans, snacks, lunch, beverages and a field trip guide
 
Minimum Number of Participants: 12
 
Maximum Number of Participants: 40
 
Transportation:
 
What to Wear or Bring with You:  Hat, layered clothing as temperatures can range from warm (70s-80s) to cool (50s) in the daytime and good hiking footware. Rain is always possible, so a light waterproof layer is advisable. No collecting will be allowed so tools are not necessary.
 
Physical Capabilities:  Must be able to walk on trails for about a half a mile over rough terrain and endure
prolonged exposure to cold, rain, sun and wind.
 
Leaders:
Alan Titus
Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument
669 S. Highway 89A
Kanab, UT 84741
Phone: (435) 619-4350
atitus@blm.gov
 
Jeffrey Eaton
Natural History Museum of Utah
PO Box 231
Tropic UT 84776
jeaton@weber.edu
 
Joseph Sertich
Denver Museum of Nature and Science
2001 Colorado Blvd
Denver, CO 80205
Phone: (303) 370-6331
joe.sertich@dmns.org