Five Field Trips will be offered in conjunction with the Annual Meeting. Advance registration for all Field Trips is required. Onsite registration will not be accepted.   SVP reserves the right to alter or cancel a Field Trip due to low registration or if access to site is limited or closed to the public.  In the event of a Field Trip cancellation, SVP will refund fees in full.

Field Trip Disclaimer
Advance Registration for all field trips is required.  Onsite Field Trip registration will not be accepted.  All Field Trips are subject to change. SVP reserves the right to alter or cancel a Field Trip due to low registration or if access to sites is limited or closed to the public.  In the event of a Field Trip cancellation, SVP will refund fees in full.

Investigating Modern and Eocene Estuarine Environments, Their Biological Communities & Depositional Facies

This five-day field trip will take place on the modern south Texas coast, in the Eocene Rio Grande Embayment at Laredo, Texas, and at the Vertebrate Paleontology Lab, University of Texas at Austin. We will first investigate modern estuarine and associated paralic coastal environments and their biological communities and sedimentary facies using the University of Texas’ Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) in Pt. Aransas as our base of operations. On board U.T.'s research Vessel Katy we will conduct trawls in hyposaline Corpus Christi Bay to study its estuarine vertebrates and inverte-brates. At Padre Island National Seashore we will observe the biological communities and depositional environments of hypersaline Laguna Madre, the sand dune complex on the open ocean side of the island and the normal salinity and sandy intertidal zones. At hyposaline Redfish Bay we will also examine a living Crassostrea oyster reef complex associated with black mangroves. In Corpus Christi, we will visit the Texas State Aquarium whose live exhibits are habitat community-based, including estuaries, and the nearshore and offshore zones.


In the Laredo area we will explore outcrops of the middle Eocene Laredo Fm., Claiborne Group. At Lake Casa Blanca International State Park, these outcrops have yielded the Casa Blanca fossil community which includes plant species from a tropical lowland rain forest and mangrove swamp. The diverse vertebrate community is comprised of more than 30 Uintan North American Land Mammal Age mammalian species (including both tarsier-like and lemur-like primates), crocodiles, turtles and snakes, as well as sharks, rays and bony fishes. Estuarine invertebrates are represented by reef-building Crassostrea oysters, other bivalves, gastropods, and arthropods. While on-outcrop we will survey for exposed fossils for on-going research projects. While enroute from Laredo to Dallas we will visit the Vertebrate Paleontology Lab collections of the University of Texas.


Date: Friday, October 9 - Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Time:
Begins Friday, October 9, at 11:00 am
Pick Up Location:
Baggage pick up area of Terminal C at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Texas
Drop Off Location:
Ends Tuesday, October 13, at the Hyatt Regency Dallas (headquarters hotel)
Cost:
$460.00 USD
Cost Includes:

Van transportation, 4 nights lodging, 3 box lunches, Welcome Dinner shrimp boil, R/V Katy cruise, Sunset dolphin cruise, Texas State Aquarium ticket, trip guidebook, and DVD of relevant paleontology publications.
Minimum Number of Participants: 18
Maximum Number of Participants: 18

Transportation:
Two rental vans

What to wear or bring with you:
Hat, sturdy shoes that can get wet (sneakers or water shoes), change of shoes, shorts or swim suit for wading to the Redfish Bay Oyster Reef and working in the swash zone on Padre Island, rain jacket for evening boat trip, sunblock, binoculars, camera, hand lens, small hand tool for outcrop prospecting, ziploch baggies for samples, backpack to hold personal equipment.

Physical Capabilities:
Must be able to walk at least 1/2 mile on outcrops and be able to board and deboard boats.

Leaders:

Jim Westgate
Lamar University, Texas State U. System (fossil & modern mammals, chondrichthyans & invertebrates)
james.westgate@lamara.edu

Carol Gee
University of Bonn
cgee@uni-bonn.de

Martin Sander
University of Bonn
martin.sander@uni-bonn.de

Early- and Mid-Cretaceous Archosaur Localities of North-Central Texas

The Early and middle Cretaceous strata of North-Central Texas contain an exceptionally rich terrestrial vertebrate fossil record that has been the focus of active research for nearly a century. Participants in this one day field trip will visit four significant and historic Early and middle Cretaceous archosaur localities that have produced a diversity of taxa from distinctly different paleoenvironments. The first stop is Jones Ranch, which yielded one of the most abundant sauropod bone accumulations known from the Early Cretaceous of North America, as well as numerous non-archosaurian vertebrate and plant fossils. The quarry is part of the Twin Mountains Formation, near the Aptian-Albian boundary. The Glen Rose Formation, the focus of the next stop, overlies the fossil bearing strata at Jones Ranch and manifests a middle Cretaceous marine transgression. The trip will then pass through historic Glen Rose, “The Dinosaur Capital of Texas,” on our way to the second stop, Dinosaur Valley State Park, where we will observe the spectacular Early Cretaceous ichnological record preserved in the Paluxy River bed, which records the behavior of multiple sauropod and theropod dinosaurs. This stop will include a visit to R. T. Bird’s famous excavation site, the Main Tracksite, the Denio Branch tracksite, and the area around the Low T/Riverbend cliff site. After a box lunch in the park among original Sinclair dinosaur sculptures from the 1964 New York World’s Fair, the trip will progress in stratigraphic sequence through the Aptian of North Texas, with a lively discussion of surrounding North Texas geology en route. The next stops will highlight the fossil-bearing Woodbine Formation of North Texas, which has been a significant component in the understanding of middle Cretaceous ecosystems. This part of the Woodbine is unique for the several significant discoveries made, mainly by amateurs, in a densely populated urban setting. The group will observe diverse paleoenvironments of the Cenomanian, including shallow marine, swamp, fluvial, and overbank deposits. The third stop will examine the extensive exposures at the Lake Grapevine Spillway, where the enantiornithine bird Flexomornis was discovered in 2010. The outing will conclude with a stop at the Arlington Archosaur Site, a recently discovered locality that is being actively excavated and studied, producing numerous fossils of dinosaurs, crocodyliforms, turtles, mammals, fish, and plants. Participants will be able to directly observe the strata where major faunal and environmental change occurred through the middle Cretaceous transition from fossil localities that continue to elucidate this poorly known interval.


Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Time:
7:00 am - 6:00 pm
Pick Up Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Drop Off Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Cost:
$85.00 USD
Cost Includes: Transportation via rental bus, admission to Dinosaur Valley State Park, snacks, lunch, water, and field trip guide.
Minimum Number of Participants: 21
Maximum Number of Participants:
48

Transportation:
Rental bus, Echo Transportation

What to wear or bring with you:
Clothing appropriate for outdoor activity, including a hat, sunscreen, and sunglasses.  Sturdy shoes for walking over uneven terrain and a water botte are recommended.  For Dinosaur Valley State Park, participants may get wet, therefore we recommend brining a change of clothes.

Physical Capabilities:
Participants should be capable of walking at least a mile over uneven terrain and endure prolonged exposure to sun and wind.

Leaders:

Christopher Strganac

Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Dallas, TX 75201

christopher.strganac@perotmuseum.org

 

Christopher Noto

University of Wisconsin–Parkside

Kenosha, WI 53141

noto@uwp.edu

 

Thomas Adams

Witte Museum

San Antonio, Texas 78209

thomasadams@wittemuseum.org

 

James Farlow

Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne

Fort Wayne, IN 46805

farlow@ipfw.edu


Ocean Dallas: Late Cretaceous Strata and Vertebrate Fossils of North Texas

This field trip takes you from west to east across the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, from the deltaic and littoral deposits of the Cenomanian Woodbine Formation, at the base of the Gulf Series, through the continuing transgression of the Western Interior Seaway represented by the Eagle Ford Group, and concludes in the deeper water marine deposits of the Austin Group. This trip encompasses a time interval from about 96 Ma to about 83 Ma; a time of rapid tectonically controlled reorganization of continents, epicontinental seas, and ocean basins. It is against this backdrop, we review the fauna of each of these units.  The marginal marine and terrestrial deposits lower in the sequence record terrestrial ecosystems, with ornithopod, theropod, and ankylosaurian dinosaurs; pterosaurs; crocodiles; turtles; birds; and mammals. The marine section preserves important fossil remains of plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, sea turtles and the occasional terrestrial and volant tetrapods,as well as a diverse invertebrate and fish fauna. The oldest fully marine deposits preserve a time of significant reorganization, including the early evolution of mosasaurs, and polycotylid and elasmosaurid plesiosaurs. The younger communities found higher in the section are comparable to those found in classic exposures in the Western Interior Seaway such as the Niobrara Formation.  


Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Time:
8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Pick Up Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Drop Off Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Cost: $50.00 USD
Cost Includes: Transportation, snacks, beverages, lunch, and field trip guide.
Minimum Number of Participants:
25
Maximum Number of Participants:
36

Transportation:
Charter bus service

What to wear or bring with you:
Hat, sunscreen, walking shoes or boots.  A light jacket may be needed depending on weather.  Participants should be able to manage short walks and exposure to sun and wind.  October in Texas is generally mild.

Leaders:

Louis L. Jacobs
Huffington Department of Earth Sciences
Southern Methodist University
3225 Daniel Ave.
Dallas, TX 72575
Tel: 214-768-2445
jacobs@smu.edu

Dale Winkler
Huffington Department of Earth Sciences
Southern Methodist University
3225 Daniel Ave.
Dallas, TX 75275
Tel: 214-768-2898
dwinkler@smu.edu

Michael J. Polcyn
Huffington Department of Earth Sciences
Southern Methodist University
3225 Daniel Ave.
Dallas, TX 75275
Tel: 469-693-8744
mpolcyn@smu.edu

Two Late Pennsylvanian Marine Vertebrate Localities in North-Central Texas

This one day field trip will journey to the northwest of the Dallas-Ft Worth metroplex area where participants will visit and examine two Late Pennsylvanian localities where significant marine vertebrate (cartilaginous and bony fish) faunas have been recovered. STOP #1 is at Lake Bridgeport in Wise County and represents a clastic-rich, distal delta front section of gray shales and inter-bedded red siderite (“ironstone”) concretions layers. Within this greater sequence are small, aerially restricted patches of gray phosphatic nodules bearing a marine vertebrate fauna not preserved in the surrounding sediments. STOP #2 is at Lost Creek Reservoir emergency spillway at Jacksboro in Jack County. The site is a classic example of “core” shale facies within a typical Pennsylvanian marine cyclothem. This exposure also contains a varied and abundant marine vertebrate assemblage dominated by various Paleozoic sharks.


Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Time:
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Pick Up Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Drop Off Location:
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Cost:
$105.00 USD
Cost Includes:
Transportation via vans, snacks, lunch, beverages, and field trip guide.
Minimum Number of Participants:
6
Maximum Number of Participants:
13

Transportation:
Vans

What to wear or bring with you:
A hat along with sunscreen and clothing covering your arms and legs.  The temperature in north Texas can be quite variable this time of year.  A water bottle would be useful.  Moderate hiking footware as the terrain is flat but may be muddy if it has rained recently.

Leaders:
John Maisey
Department of Vertebrate Paleontology
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY, USA   10024-5192

maisey@amnh.org


Mark McKinzie
2316 Ridge Lane
Grapevine, TX, USA   76051
cdmckinz@flash.net


Permian Vertebrate-Bearing Strata of North-Central Texas

This three-day field trip will visit Early Permian vertebrate sites in north central Texas. We will stay in Wichita Falls, but the locations that will be visited are ~50 to 100 miles west of Wichita Falls by SUV. Emphasis will be placed on outcrops of Lower Permian strata including the Archer City Formation, Petrolia Formation, Waggoner Ranch Formation, and Clear Fork Group. Most activities will occur on the Waggoner Ranch, famous as the single, largest, contiguous ranch on the planet. Several famous vertebrate-bearing beds will be visited, and the geological and paleoenvironmental context of these strata will be emphasized through discussion and review of previous work on these outcrops.

Note: The registration rates refer to 1 person per room (Single; it doesn't matter how many beds) or 2 persons per room (Double) with two beds.


Date: Sunday, October 18 - Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Pick Up Location:
Begins Sunday, October 18, at 7:30 am at the Hyatt Regency Dallas
Drop Off Location:
Ends Tuesday, October 20, at 6:00 pm at the Hyatt Regency Dallas
Cost:
$375.00 USD (double)/$485.00 USD (Single)
Cost Includes:
lunches, drinks, field guide, and hotel (based on single or double occupancy)
Minimum Number of Participants:
6
Maximum Number of Participants:
18

Transportation:
Rental SUVs

What to wear or bring with you:
A broad-rimmed hat, sunscreen, and clothing that covers your arms and legs.  A 1 liter water bottle that can be refilled from water containeer in vans.  Bring sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots.

Physical Capabilities:
Must be able to walk on trails for about a half amile and endure prolonged exposure to sun, wind, and rain.

Leaders:
Gary Johnson
Huffington Department of Earth Sciences
Southern Methodist University
3225 Daniel St.
Dallas, TX 75275-0395
johnsong@mail.smu.edu

 
Neil Tabor
Huffington Department of Earth Sciences
Southern Methodist University
3225 Daniel St.
Dallas, TX 75275-0395
ntabor@smu.edu

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