Symposium

SVP 2018 Podium and poster Symposia (Invited speakers only)

 
SVP 2018 will feature 3 podium symposia: 

Building a Phenomic Universe: Collection, Management, and Applications of Digital Morphological Data
Akinobu Watanabe and Jen A. Bright, organizers
 
Advances in imaging technology have enabled the rapid digitization of phenomes (the sum total of an organism’s phenotypic traits), and concomitant developments in applications and analysis have led to a blossoming of diverse research approaches in vertebrate paleontology. This symposium will highlight research from across the vertebrate tree of life while encompassing the full spectrum of digital morphological techniques, including state-of-the-art digitization of specimens, creative management of large-scale data, and innovative applications of digital phenomic data. 

The Beginning of the Age of Crocodiles
Stephanie K. Drumheller and Casey M. Holliday, organizers
 
One of the key evolutionary transformations among vertebrates occurred during the origin of crocodile-line archosaurs. Through the Triassic and Jurassic, members of this lineage diversified on land and in water, producing forms that experimented with carnivory and herbivory, bipedality and quadrupedality, and a variety of growth strategies. This symposium brings together researchers employing diverse methods to explore the paleobiology of the early Mesozoic suchians, highlighting new research exploring the morphology, ontogeny, dietary adaptations, locomotion, and systematics of crocodylomorphs to understand their biomechanics, function, ecology, and evolution.
 
Big Questions, Big Data
Richard Butler, Danielle Fraser, and Graeme Lloyd, organizers
 
Major advances in vertebrate paleontology have been and continue to be enabled by analysis of large-scale, primarily community-led, database efforts that focus on integrating spatial, geologic, taxonomic, and ecologic data to address a large diversity of research questions.  What began as individualized research efforts in the 1990s have matured into major digital resources that enable an exploration of vertebrate evolution in an analytic framework and have spurred the development of new methods that can better exploit these compilations.  This symposium highlights research that is enabled by big data: changes in community structure, global diversity patterns and their structure, macroecology, species interactions, and recovery from extinction.  Proposed presentations span the Paleozoic to the Cenozoic and a broad range of major vertebrate groups whilst focusing on the challenges presented by the patchiness of the fossil record and the future of community-led databases in the research ecosystem.